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Hershey Sprint Car Experience 2024

When

May 13, 2024    
5:00 pm

Event Type

A Celebration of Local Racing History and Progress

Hosted by MHS in partnership with Hersheypark and World of Outlaws

Our event celebrates modern-day racing while paying tribute to those who raced at Hershey Stadium Speedway 85 years ago. You read that right—Milton S. Hershey built Hersheypark Stadium in 1937 to be a speedway! From the outside looking in, you might question what Milton Hershey School, Hersheypark, and World of Outlaws have in common. A lot—and it all ties back to Mr. Hershey.

Join us at Hersheypark Stadium on Monday, May 13 from 5-7 p.m. for a chance to:

  • Meet World of Outlaws and PA Posse drivers with their cars.
  • Tour driver rigs and chat with crew.
  • Sit in an antique race car.
  • Snap pictures at Victory Lane.
  • Free event shirts, special giveaways, and more, while supplies last.
  • This is a free, family-friendly event. Alcohol is prohibited.

Learn More about Our PartnershipDownload the Event Flyer (PDF)

A History of Hershey Motorists

Hersheypark Stadium began construction in 1937. With seating designed specifically six feet off the ground for auto racing, the stadium was built as the last major project of Hershey’s Great Building Campaign.

Hershey Stadium Speedway was built with eight towers, each 98 feet high, to floodlight the field with 200,000-250,000 watts. Hershey Stadium Speedway’s formal dedication ceremony was held on July 4, 1939. Tickets for the speedway ranged from $.45-$.75 for adults and $.25 for children. On opening night in 1939, 11,265 race fans packed into Hershey Stadium Speedway to see midget cars.

Milton S. Hershey was an early adapter to automobiles. In 1911, at a time when the automobile era was still in its infancy, the town of Hershey produced a cocoa bean-shaped booklet titled, “Hershey, The Chocolate Town,” to encourage motorists to visit. Included in this booklet was a self-guided tour called, “The Motorist Delight.”

Milton Hershey School does not discriminate in admissions or other programs and services on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, ancestry, sex, religious creed or disability. Read important MHS policies on equal opportunity and diversity, equal employment opportunity, and more.